This moment

{this moment} – A Friday ritual. A single photo – no words – capturing a moment from the week. A simple, special, extraordinary moment. A moment I want to pause, savor and remember.

If you’re inspired to do the same, leave a link to your ‘moment’ in the comments for all to find and see.

20130531-135546.jpg

Advertisements

{this moment} – A Friday ritual. A single photo – no words – capturing a moment from the week. A simple, special, extraordinary moment. A moment I want to pause, savor and remember.

If you’re inspired to do the same, leave a link to your ‘moment’ in the comments for all to find and see.

stamp

Trauma in Oklahoma

candleheart

Sometimes it feels like trauma is everywhere. With recent bombings, kidnappings and sexual assaults, the tornado that devastated communities in Oklahoma last night adds to the sense of systemic grief some of us are wrestling with. Some of us react with anger, some sadness. Some of us fight or escape, numb ourselves or feel paralyzed. Some of us are desperate to connect with others, while others isolate. Some of us are at a loss for words, and some of us can’t stop talking about it. Some of us avoid the news, and some of us lose hours looking at media footage online. These things cause us to question our faith (spiritual or in humanity), or they root us more deeply in it.  We all respond to trauma differently, but that’s what all of these experiences are: trauma symptoms.  Trauma symptoms are very normal reactions to very abnormal and horrible experiences.

SPCC is in the practice of supporting children exposed to trauma, and helping their caregivers do the same. While our work is focused on child maltreatment and family violence, we recognize that trauma comes in many forms. For those families deeply and closely impacted by the recent tornado, as well as for families across the country, we highly recommend taking a look at The National Child Traumatic Stress Network’s “Tips for Parents on Media Coverage of Tornadoes”.

(http://www.nctsn.org/sites/default/files/assets/pdfs/tornadoes_media_final.pdf)

This two page document is informative and practical, and provides information on how to have conversations with children, media exposure impact, and what to be aware of.  In addition to the NCTSN Tips, please remember that children and adults who have experienced traumatic  events in the past, regardless of the type of trauma,  are much more susceptible to secondary trauma reactions through this media coverage. If you or your child fall in to this category, please be particularly mindful of how you are being impacted.

Our hearts go out to the individuals, families and communities impacted by this natural disaster.

this moment

Joining http://www.soulemama.com {this moment} – A Friday ritual. A single photo – no words – capturing a moment from the week. A simple, special, extraordinary moment. A moment I want to pause, savor and remember.

If you’re inspired to do the same, leave a link to your ‘moment’ in the comments for all to find and see.

20130517-110026.jpg

Connecting.

 

magnolia

The snow kept falling well past the first day of spring in Rochester, NY this year, but that didn’t stop SPCC from diving in to some virtual spring cleaning in April. We took a good look at our old website and recognized that we needed to dust off the cobwebs, shake out the rugs, and put a crisp coat of paint on the walls. And, just in time for the Magnolia tree blossoms….. our new, fresh website is ready to be unveiled!

As we looked critically at our old website, we also began to think about SPCC’s online presence in general, and what we could do to better connect with you, our community. We thought about how this could look, and what we wanted it to feel like. We wondered how to best foster our online community. And we kept coming back to one idea:

After 138 years, we have a lot of stories to tell.

And with that, SPCC decided to create this blog to share our stories.

Over the months and years to come, we will share stories of our agency history, what we have learned about children and families, and how our experience and care informs us. We hope to share stories of the beautiful and complex work that SPCC does. We want to share stories of people who are impacted by SPCC, and their fight to find meaning, peace and strength within themselves and in their relationships. We hope to share stories that resonate with all of us: stories of care, compassion, struggle and growth.

Stories that unite us as parents, children, sisters, brothers, grandparents, foster parents, professionals, friends, and community members and remind us of the threads of compassion, curiosity, meaning and growth that connect us all.

We invite you to check back with us often, or better yet- ‘like’ us on Facebook or Twitter so that you can be notified when a new blog post is up. Let us know what stories you would like to hear, and what topics would be of interest to you.

Sarah Fitzgibbons, LMHC

Clinical Director

sfitzgibbons@spcc-roch.org